Michael O’Leary reacts to Ryanair “mess”

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Ryanair CEO Michael O’Leary has responded to the airline’s mass cancellation of flights with an apology, several days after the issue first reared its head.

The Irish airline is in crisis mode, cancelling dozens of flights a day as it struggles with a backlog of annual leave. Media reports this weekend were dominated by inconvenienced passengers voicing their grievances on social media and in airports.

“While over 98% of our customers will not be affected by these cancellations over the next six weeks, we apologise unreservedly to those customers whose travel will be disrupted, and assure them that we have done our utmost to try to ensure that we can re-accommodate most of them on alternative flights on the same or next day,” said O’Leary today.

Confusion regarding the cause of the cancellations mounted over the weekend, with the Irish Airline Pilots’ Association claiming that 700 pilots have left the airline in the past financial year and that issues surrounding annual leave have been known for some time.

“Ryanair is not short of pilots – we were able to fully crew our peak summer schedule in June, July and August – but we have messed up the allocation of annual leave to pilots in September and October because we are trying to allocate a full year’s leave into a nine-month period from April to December,” O’Leary responded. “This issue will not recur in 2018 as Ryanair goes back onto a 12-month calendar leave year from January 1st to December 31st 2018.

“This is a mess of our own making,” he said. “I apologise sincerely to all our customers for any worry or concern this has caused them over the past weekend. We have only taken this decision to cancel this small proportion of our 2,500 daily flights so that we can provide extra standby cover and protect the punctuality of the 98% of flights that will be unaffected by these cancellations.”

The crisis is expected to cost the airline millions in compensation under European regulations.

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Jaguar launches I-Pace one-make racing series

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Luxury carmaker Jaguar has announced a one-make racing series based around its electric I-Pace sports car, with the first race taking place next year.

The series, known as the I-Pace eTrophy, will use an ‘arrive and drive’ format for 20 drivers at each race with full technical support, spare parts and equipment. The modified electric I-Paces will use technology from the manufacturer’s I-Pace SUV, which will go on sale later this year.

“With 20 identical specification production based I-Pace eTrophy race cars going head to head, it comes down to the drivers and their individual driving styles to be crowned champion,” the company said. “Held over ten races and in some of the world’s most celebrated cities, the Jaguar I-Pace eTrophy promises to be the next chapter in our Race To Innovate.”

The new series will appear on the supporting bill of the all-electric Formula E world championship, which Jaguar Racing joined in 2016. The company recently announced that all its new road cars will be electric or hybrid from 2020 onwards.

“Jaguar returned to racing in 2016 with the mission ‘Race to Innovate’,” explained Gerd Mäuser, Jaguar Racing chairman. “With the launch of the Jaguar I-Pace eTrophy, we’ve strengthened our commitment to battery electric vehicles, international motorsport and Formula E. As a British team, we’re proud to announce today the launch of the world’s first production battery electric vehicle championship. We’ve always said we want to prove our electrification technologies on the track – this is the proof.

“I’m looking forward to seeing a full grid of Jaguar I-Pace race cars in late 2018, soon after the first Jaguar I-Pace hits the road in Europe. Ultimately, this innovative series will enhance the technology in our future electric vehicles and benefit our customers. Formula E has grown exponentially since we joined as the first premium manufacturer last year, with recent commitments from Audi, Mercedes-Benz and Porsche,” he said.

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Offshore wind energy now cheaper than nuclear or gas as prices tumble

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The average cost of offshore wind energy has fallen 47% since February 2015, according to the results of an auction of 3,196 megawatts of power generated by three new windfarms.

The three projects, located off the coasts of Yorkshire, Lincolnshire and north-east Scotland, can power the equivalent of 3.3m homes and the results of the auction for contracts for difference were announced by the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy.

According to trade body RenewableUK, the price comes in lower than nuclear power and gas. The windfarms are scheduled to come onstream between 2021 and 2023.

“We knew today’s results would be impressive, but these are astounding,” said RenewableUK’s CEO Hugh McNeal. “Record-breaking cost reductions like the ones achieved by offshore wind are unprecedented for large energy infrastructure. Offshore wind developers have focused relentlessly on innovation, and the sector is investing £17.5bn into the UK over the next four years whilst saving our consumers money.

“Today’s results are further proof that innovation in the offshore wind industry will bring economic growth for the UK on an industrial scale. The UK needs to establish new trading opportunities as we leave the European Union, and the UK’s offshore wind sector is a world leader in a global renewable energy market currently worth $290 billion a year.”